A fly may sting a stately horse and make him wince; but one is but an insect, and the other is a horse still.
View quote | Quotes about Abuse

Life affords no higher pleasure than that of surmounting difficulties, passing from one step of success to another, forming new wishes and seeing them gratified.
View quote | Quotes about Achievement

Nothing will ever be attempted if all possible objections must first be overcome.
View quote | Quotes about Achievement

Players, Sir! I look on them as no better than creatures set upon tables and joint stools to make faces and produce laughter, like dancing dogs.
View quote | Quotes about Acting and Actors

Adversity is the state in which man mostly easily becomes acquainted with himself, being especially free of admirers then.
View quote | Quotes about Adversity

The trade of advertising is now so near perfection that it is not easy to propose any improvement. But as every art ought to be exercised in due subordination to the public good, I cannot but propose it as a moral question to these masters of the public ear, whether they do not sometimes play too wantonly with our passions.
View quote | Quotes about Advertising

Promise, large promise, is the soul of an advertisement.
View quote | Quotes about Advertising

The advice that is wanted is commonly not welcome and that which is not wanted, evidently an effrontery.
View quote | Quotes about Advice

When I was as you are now, towering in the confidence of twenty-one, little did I suspect that I should be at forty-nine, what I now am.
View quote | Quotes about Age and Aging

At seventy-seven it is time to be in earnest.
View quote | Quotes about Age and Aging

A man who exposes himself when he is intoxicated, has not the art of getting drunk.
View quote | Quotes about Alcohol and Alcoholism

There is nothing which has yet been contrived by man, by which so much happiness is produced as by a good tavern.
View quote | Quotes about Alcohol and Alcoholism

There are some sluggish men who are improved by drinking; as there are fruits that are not good until they are rotten.
View quote | Quotes about Alcohol and Alcoholism

He that fails in his endeavors after wealth or power will not long retain either honesty or courage.
View quote | Quotes about Ambition

To be happy at home is the ultimate result of all ambition, the end to which every enterprise and labor tends, and of which every desire prompts the prosecution.
View quote | Quotes about Ambition

Sir, they are a race of convicts, and ought to be thankful for anything we allow them short of hanging.
View quote | Quotes about America

I am willing to love all mankind, except an American.
View quote | Quotes about America

We love to expect, and when expectation is either disappointed or gratified, we want to be again expecting.
View quote | Quotes about Anticipation

Few enterprises of great labor or hazard would be undertaken if we had not the power of magnifying the advantages we expect from them.
View quote | Quotes about Anticipation

Nothing is more common than mutual dislike, where mutual approbation is particularly expected.
View quote | Quotes about Antipathy

The applause of a single human being is of great consequence.
View quote | Quotes about Approval

Every man thinks meanly of himself for not having been a soldier, or not having been at sea.
View quote | Quotes about Army and Navy

No man will be a sailor who has contrivance enough to get himself into a jail; for being in a ship is being in a jail, with the chance of being drowned. A man in a jail has more room, better food and commonly better company.
View quote | Quotes about Army and Navy

No man but a blockhead ever wrote, except for money.
View quote | Quotes about Arts and Artists

They that have grown old in a single state are generally found to be morose, fretful and captious; tenacious of their own practices and maxims; soon offended by contradiction or negligence; and impatient of any association but with those that will watch their nod, and submit themselves to unlimited authority.
View quote | Quotes about Bachelor

The happiest part of a man's life is what he passes lying awake in bed in the morning.
View quote | Quotes about Bed

I have thought of a pulley to raise me gradually; but that would give me pain, as it would counteract my natural inclination. I would have something that can dissipate the inertia and give elasticity to the muscles. We can heat the body, we can cool it; we can give it tension or relaxation; and surely it is possible to bring it into a state in which rising from bed will not be a pain.
View quote | Quotes about Bed

Every man who attacks my belief, diminishes in some degree my confidence in it, and therefore makes me uneasy; and I am angry with him who makes me uneasy.
View quote | Quotes about Belief

Nobody can write the life of a man but those who have eat and drunk and lived in social intercourse with him.
View quote | Quotes about Biography

The return of my birthday, if I remember it, fills me with thoughts which it seems to be the general care of humanity to escape.
View quote | Quotes about Birthdays

What is written without effort is in general read without pleasure.
View quote | Quotes about Books - Reading

Books that you carry to the fire, and hold readily in your hand, are most useful after all.
View quote | Quotes about Books - Reading

A man ought to read just as his inclination leads him; for what he reads as a task will do him little good.
View quote | Quotes about Books - Reading

Sir, you have but two topics, yourself and me. I am sick of both.
View quote | Quotes about Bores and Boredom

Surely a long life must be somewhat tedious, since we are forced to call in so many trifling things to help rid us of our time, which will never return.
View quote | Quotes about Bores and Boredom

Every other enjoyment malice may destroy; every other panegyric envy may withhold; but no human power can deprive the boaster of his own encomiums.
View quote | Quotes about Bragging

Do not accustom yourself to consider debt only as an inconvenience. You will find it a calamity.
View quote | Quotes about Calamity

I am sorry I have not learnt to play at cards. It is very useful in life: it generates kindness, and consolidates society.
View quote | Quotes about Cards

No member of society has the right to teach any doctrine contrary to what society holds to be true.
View quote | Quotes about Censorship

It seems not more reasonable to leave the right of printing unrestrained, because writers may be afterwards censured, than it would be to sleep with doors unbolted, because by our laws we can hang a thief.
View quote | Quotes about Censorship

Such is the state of life, that none are happy but by the anticipation of change: the change itself is nothing; when we have made it, the next wish is to change again. The world is not yet exhausted; let me see something tomorrow which I never saw before.
View quote | Quotes about Change

He who waits to do a great deal of good at once, will never do anything.
View quote | Quotes about Charity

You are much surer that you are doing good when you pay money to those who work, as the recompense of their labor, than when you give money merely in charity.
View quote | Quotes about Charity

There are charms made only for distance admiration.
View quote | Quotes about Charm

Christianity is the highest perfection of humanity.
View quote | Quotes about Christians and Christianity

This merriment of parsons is mighty offensive.
View quote | Quotes about Churches

Prepare for death, if here at night you roam, and sign your will before you sup from home.
View quote | Quotes about Cities and City Life

The wretched have no compassion, they can do good only from strong principles of duty.
View quote | Quotes about Compassion

The usual fortune of complaint is to excite contempt more than pity.
View quote | Quotes about Complaints and Complaining

Depend upon it that if a man talks of his misfortunes there is something in them that is not disagreeable to him.
View quote | Quotes about Complaints and Complaining

Hunger is never delicate; they who are seldom gorged to the full with praise may be safely fed with gross compliments, for the appetite must be satisfied before it is disgusted.
View quote | Quotes about Compliments

Life cannot subsist in society but by reciprocal concessions.
View quote | Quotes about Compromise

Those who attain to any excellence commonly spend life in some single pursuit, for excellence is not often gained upon easier terms.
View quote | Quotes about Concentration

Self-confidence is the first requisite to great undertakings.
View quote | Quotes about Confidence

There can be no friendship without confidence, and no confidence without integrity.
View quote | Quotes about Confidence

It generally happens that assurance keeps an even pace with ability.
View quote | Quotes about Confidence

The luster of diamonds is invigorated by the interposition of darker bodies; the lights of a picture are created by the shades; the highest pleasure which nature has indulged to sensitive perception is that of rest after fatigue.
View quote | Quotes about Contrast

The happiest conversation is that of which nothing is distinctly remembered but a general effect of pleasing impression.
View quote | Quotes about Conversation

I never desire to converse with a man who has written more than he has read.
View quote | Quotes about Conversation

No two men can be half an hour together but one shall acquire an evident superiority over the other.
View quote | Quotes about Cooperation

Bravery has no place where it can avail nothing.
View quote | Quotes about Courage

He that would be superior to external influences must first become superior to his own passions.
View quote | Quotes about Courage

Courage is a quality so necessary for maintaining virtue, that it is always respected, even when it is associated with vice.
View quote | Quotes about Courage

I hate a fellow whom pride, or cowardice, or laziness drives into a corner, and who does nothing when he is there but sit and growl; let him come out as I do, and bark.
View quote | Quotes about Coward and Cowardice

There are innumerable questions to which the inquisitive mind can in this state receive no answer: Why do you and I exist? Why was this world created? Since it was to be created, why was it not created sooner?
View quote | Quotes about Creation

Criticism is a study by which men grow important and formidable at very small expense. He whom nature has made weak, and idleness keeps ignorant, may yet support his vanity by the name of a critic.
View quote | Quotes about Critics and Criticism

Criticism, as it was first instituted by Aristotle, was meant as a standard of judging well.
View quote | Quotes about Critics and Criticism

I would rather be attacked than unnoticed. For the worst thing you can do to an author is to be silent as to his works. An assault upon a town is a bad thing; but starving it is still worse.
View quote | Quotes about Critics and Criticism

Curiosity is one of the permanent and certain characteristics of a vigorous mind.
View quote | Quotes about Curiosity

Curiosity is, in great and generous minds, the first passion and the last.
View quote | Quotes about Curiosity

You teach your daughters the diameters of the planets and wonder when you are done that they do not delight in your company.
View quote | Quotes about Daughters

It matters not how a man dies, but how he lives. The act of dying is not of importance, it lasts so short a time.
View quote | Quotes about Death and Dying

I will be conquered; I will not capitulate.
View quote | Quotes about Death and Dying

Small debts are like small gun shot; they are rattling around us on all sides and one can scarcely escape being wounded. Large debts are like canons, they produce a loud noise, but are of little danger.
View quote | Quotes about Debt

I have always considered it as treason against the great republic of human nature, to make any man's virtues the means of deceiving him.
View quote | Quotes about Deception

Life is a progress from want to want, not from enjoyment to enjoyment.
View quote | Quotes about Desire

Some desire is necessary to keep life in motion, and he whose real wants are supplied must admit those of fancy.
View quote | Quotes about Desire

If your determination is fixed, I do not counsel you to despair. Few things are impossible to diligence and skill. Great works are performed not by strength, but perseverance.
View quote | Quotes about Determination

Dictionaries are like watches; the worst is better than none, and the best cannot be expected to be quite true.
View quote | Quotes about Dictionaries

Every other author may aspire to praise; the lexicographer can only hope to escape reproach, and even this negative recompense has been yet granted to very few.
View quote | Quotes about Dictionaries

Lexicographer: a writer of dictionaries, a harmless drudge, that busies himself in tracing the original, and detailing the signification of words.
View quote | Quotes about Dictionaries

Few things are impossible to diligence and skill. Great works are performed not by strength, but perseverance.
View quote | Quotes about Diligence

Disappointment, when it involves neither shame nor loss, is as good as success; for it supplies as many images to the mind, and as many topics to the tongue.
View quote | Quotes about Disappointments

No man likes to live under the eye of perpetual disapprobation.
View quote | Quotes about Disapproval

Disease generally begins that equality which death completes.
View quote | Quotes about Disease

Sir, a man who cannot get to heaven in a green coat, will not find his way thither the sooner in a gray one.
View quote | Quotes about Dress

Sir, he was dull in company, dull in his closet, dull everywhere. He was dull in a new way, and that made many people think him great.
View quote | Quotes about Dullness

Read your own compositions, and when you meet a passage which you think is particularly fine, strike it out.
View quote | Quotes about Editing and Editors

What we hope ever to do with ease, we must learn first to do with diligence.
View quote | Quotes about Effort

A am a great friend of public amusements, they keep people from vice.
View quote | Quotes about Entertainment

The love of life is necessary to the vigorous prosecution of any undertaking.
View quote | Quotes about Enthusiasm

His scorn of the great is repeated too often to be real; no man thinks much of that which he despises.
View quote | Quotes about Envy

In lapidary inscriptions a man is not upon oath.
View quote | Quotes about Epitaphs

Subordination tends greatly to human happiness. Were we all upon an equality, we should have no other enjoyment than mere animal pleasure.
View quote | Quotes about Equality

It is not true that people are naturally equal for no two people can be together for even a half an hour without one acquiring an evident superiority over the other.
View quote | Quotes about Equality

It is better that some should be unhappy than that none should be happy, which would be the case in a general state of equality.
View quote | Quotes about Equality

They teach the morals of a whore, and the manners of a dancing master.
View quote | Quotes about Example

Exercise is labor without weariness.
View quote | Quotes about Exercise

I know not anything more pleasant, or more instructive, than to compare experience with expectation, or to register from time to time the difference between idea and reality. It is by this kind of observation that we grow daily less liable to be disappointed.
View quote | Quotes about Expectation

As to the rout that is made about people who are ruined by extravagance, it is no matter to the nation that some individuals suffer. When so much general productive exertion is the consequence of luxury, the nation does not care though there are debtors; nay, they would not care though their creditors were there too.
View quote | Quotes about Extravagance

He that pursues fame with just claims, trusts his happiness to the winds; but he that endeavors after it by false merit, has to fear, not only the violence of the storm, but the leaks of his vessel.
View quote | Quotes about Fame

To get a name can happen but to few; it is one of the few things that cannot be brought. It is the free gift of mankind, which must be deserved before it will be granted, and is at last unwillingly bestowed.
View quote | Quotes about Fame

Parents and children seldom act in concert: each child endeavors to appropriate the esteem or fondness of the parents, and the parents, with yet less temptation, betray each other to their children.
View quote | Quotes about Family

Shame arises from the fear of men, conscience from the fear of God.
View quote | Quotes about Fear

Fear is implanted in us as a preservative from evil; but its duty, like that of other passions, is not to overbear reason, but to assist it. It should not be suffered to tyrannize
View quote | Quotes about Fear

Fly fishing may be a very pleasant amusement; but angling or float fishing I can only compare to a stick and a string, with a worm at one end and a fool at the other.
View quote | Quotes about Fishing

Just praise is only a debt, but flattery is a present.
View quote | Quotes about Flattery

Nothing flatters a man as much as the happiness of his wife; he is always proud of himself as the source of it.
View quote | Quotes about Flattery

There are few things that we so unwillingly give up, even in advanced age, as the supposition that we still have the power of ingratiating ourselves with the fair sex.
View quote | Quotes about Flirting

When a man knows he is to be hanged in a fortnight, it concentrates his mind wonderfully.
View quote | Quotes about Focus

Extended empires are like expanded gold, exchanging solid strength for feeble splendor.
View quote | Quotes about Focus

A man seldom thinks with more earnestness of anything than he does of his dinner.
View quote | Quotes about Food and Eating

He who does not mind his belly, will hardly mind anything else.
View quote | Quotes about Food and Eating

All theory is against freedom of the will; all experience for it.
View quote | Quotes about Freedom

Every man has a right to utter what he thinks truth, and every other man has a right to knock him down for it. Martyrdom is the test.
View quote | Quotes about Freedom of Speech

If a man does not make new acquaintances as he advances through life, he will soon find himself left alone; one should keep his friendships in constant repair.
View quote | Quotes about Friends and Friendship

I look upon every day to be lost, in which I do not make a new acquaintance.
View quote | Quotes about Friends and Friendship

Never, my dear Sir, do you take it into your head that I do not love you; you may settle yourself in full confidence both of my love and my esteem; I love you as a kind man, I value you as a worthy man, and hope in time to reverence you as a man of exemplary piety.
View quote | Quotes about Friends and Friendship

The endearing elegance of female friendship.
View quote | Quotes about Friends and Friendship

To let friendship die away by negligence and silence is certainly not wise. It is voluntarily to throw away one of the greatest comforts of the weary pilgrimage.
View quote | Quotes about Friends and Friendship

The most fatal disease of friendship is gradual decay, or dislike hourly increased by causes too slender for complaint, and too numerous for removal.
View quote | Quotes about Friends and Friendship

The future is purchased by the present.
View quote | Quotes about Future

Tomorrow is an old deceiver, and his cheat never grows stale.
View quote | Quotes about Future

Sir, I do not call a gamester a dishonest man; but I call him an unsociable man, an unprofitable man. Gaming is a mode of transferring property without producing any intermediate good.
View quote | Quotes about Gambling

Our tastes greatly alter. The lad does not care for the child's rattle, and the old man does not care for the young man's whore.
View quote | Quotes about Generations

Sir, he throws away his money without thought and without merit. I do not call a tree generous that sheds its fruit at every breeze.
View quote | Quotes about Generosity

The chief glory of every people arises from its authors.
View quote | Quotes about Glory

The Supreme end of education is expert discernment in all things -- the power to tell the good from the bad, the genuine from the counterfeit, and to prefer the good and the genuine to the bad and the counterfeit.
View quote | Quotes about Good and Evil

I would not give half a guinea to live under one form of government rather than another. It is of no moment to the happiness of an individual.
View quote | Quotes about Government

There are minds so impatient of inferiority that their gratitude is a species of revenge, and they return benefits, not because recompense is a pleasure, but because obligation is a pain.
View quote | Quotes about Gratitude

He was dull in a new way, and that made many think him great.
View quote | Quotes about Greatness

No one ever became great by imitation.
View quote | Quotes about Greatness

The superiority of some men is merely local. They are great because their associates are little.
View quote | Quotes about Greatness

Avarice is generally the last passion of those lives of which the first part has been squandered in pleasure, and the second devoted to ambition. He that sinks under the fatigue of getting wealth, lulls his age with the milder business of saving it.
View quote | Quotes about Greed

While grief is fresh, every attempt to divert only irritates. You must wait till grief be digested, and then amusement will dissipate the remains of it.
View quote | Quotes about Grief

Where grief is fresh, any attempt to divert it only irritates.
View quote | Quotes about Grief

We are inclined to believe those whom we don not know because they have never deceived us.
View quote | Quotes about Gullibility

The habit of looking on the best side of every event is worth more than a thousand pounds a years.
View quote | Quotes about Habit

The chains of habit are generally too week to be felt, until they are too strong to be broken.
View quote | Quotes about Habit

Sir, that all who are happy, are equally happy, is not true. A peasant and a philosopher may be equally satisfied, but not equally happy. Happiness consists in the multiplicity of agreeable consciousness.
View quote | Quotes about Happiness

To strive with difficulties, and to conquer them, is the highest human felicity.
View quote | Quotes about Happiness

We are long before we are convinced that happiness is never to be found; and each believes it possessed by others, to keep alive the hope of obtaining it for himself.
View quote | Quotes about Happiness

Happiness is not a state to arrive at, rather, a manner of traveling.
View quote | Quotes about Happiness

For who is pleased with himself.
View quote | Quotes about Happiness

Claret is the liquor for boys; port for men; but he who aspires to be a hero must drink brandy.
View quote | Quotes about Heroes and Heroism

Great abilities are not requisite for an Historian; for in historical composition, all the greatest powers of the human mind are quiescent. He has facts ready to his hand; so there is no exercise of invention. Imagination is not required in any degree; only about as much as is used in the lowest kinds of poetry. Some penetration, accuracy, and coloring, will fit a man for the task, if he can give the application which is necessary.
View quote | Quotes about History and Historians

It is, indeed, at home that every man must be known by those who would make a just estimate either of his virtue or felicity; for smiles and embroidery are alike occasional, and the mind is often dressed for show in painted honor, and fictitious benevolence.
View quote | Quotes about Home

No money is better spent than what is laid out for domestic satisfaction.
View quote | Quotes about Home

The natural flights of the human mind are not from pleasure to pleasure, but from hope to hope.
View quote | Quotes about Hope

Nothing is more hopeless than a scheme of merriment.
View quote | Quotes about Hope

Hope is itself a species of happiness, and, perhaps, the chief happiness which this world affords: but, like all other pleasures immoderately enjoyed, the excesses of hope must be expiated by pain; and expectations improperly indulged must end in disappointment.
View quote | Quotes about Hope

I hate mankind, for I think of myself as one of the best of them, and I know how bad I am.
View quote | Quotes about Humankind

I am a great friend to public amusements, for they keep the people from vice.
View quote | Quotes about Humor

It is very strange, and very melancholy, that the paucity of human pleasures should persuade us ever to call hunting one of them.
View quote | Quotes about Hunting

Sir, a man may be so much of everything, that he is nothing of anything.
View quote | Quotes about Identity

As peace is the end of war, so to be idle is the ultimate purpose of the busy.
View quote | Quotes about Idleness

Perhaps man is the only being that can properly be called idle.
View quote | Quotes about Idleness

Were it not for imagination a man would be as happy in arms of a chambermaid as of a duchess.
View quote | Quotes about Imagination

Almost all absurdity of conduct arises from the imitation of those who we cannot resemble.
View quote | Quotes about Imitation

No man was ever great by imitation.
View quote | Quotes about Imitation

I have protracted my work till most of those whom I wished to please have sunk into the grave, and success and miscarriage are empty sounds: I therefore dismiss it with frigid tranquillity, having little to fear or hope from censure or from praise.
View quote | Quotes about Indifference

So far is it from being true that men are naturally equal, that no two people can be half an hour together, but one shall acquire an evident superiority over the other.
View quote | Quotes about Inequality

No man is much regarded by the rest of the world. He that considers how little he dwells upon the condition of others, will learn how little the attention of others is attracted by himself. While we see multitudes passing before us, of whom perhaps not one appears to deserve our notice or excites our sympathy, we should remember, that we likewise are lost in the same throng, that the eye which happens to glance upon us is turned in a moment on him that follows us, and that the utmost which we can reasonably hope or fear is to fill a vacant hour with prattle, and be forgotten.
View quote | Quotes about Insignificance

Integrity without knowledge is weak and useless, and knowledge without integrity is dangerous and dreadful.
View quote | Quotes about Integrity

It is easy to talk of sitting at home contented, when others are seeing or making shows. But not to have been where it is supposed, and seldom supposed falsely, that all would go if they could; to be able to say nothing when everyone is talking; to have no opinion when everyone is judging; to hear exclamations of rapture without power to depress; to listen to falsehoods without right to contradict, is, after all, a state of temporary inferiority, in which the mind is rather hardened by stubbornness, than supported by fortitude. If the world be worth winning let us enjoy it, if it is to be despised let us despise it by conviction. But the world is not to be despised but as it is compared with something better.
View quote | Quotes about Involvement

I gleaned jests at home from obsolete farces.
View quote | Quotes about Jokes and Jokers

A Judge may be a farmer; but he is not to geld his own pigs. A Judge may play a little at cards for his own amusement; but he is not to play at marbles, or chuck farthing in the Piazza.
View quote | Quotes about Judgment and Judges

To cultivate kindness is a valuable part of the business of life.
View quote | Quotes about Kindness

To act from pure benevolence is not possible for finite human beings, Human benevolence is mingled with vanity, interest, or some other motive.
View quote | Quotes about Kindness

I have found men to be more kind than I expected, and less just.
View quote | Quotes about Kindness

The next best thing to knowing something is knowing where to find it.
View quote | Quotes about Knowledge

More knowledge may be gained of a man's real character by a short conversation with one of his servants than from a formal and studied narrative, begun with his pedigree and ended with his funeral.
View quote | Quotes about Knowledge

Man is not weak; knowledge is more than equivalent to force.
View quote | Quotes about Knowledge

Knowledge is of two kinds: We know a subject ourselves, or we know where we can find information about it.
View quote | Quotes about Knowledge

Knowledge always demands increase; it is like fire, which must first be kindled by some external agent, but will afterwards always propagate itself.
View quote | Quotes about Knowledge

Knowledge is more than equivalent to force.
View quote | Quotes about Knowledge

Excellence in any department can be attained only by the labor of a lifetime; it is not to be purchased at a lesser price.
View quote | Quotes about Labor

Labor, if it were not necessary for existence, would be indispensable for the happiness of man.
View quote | Quotes about Labor

Language is only the instrument of science, and words are but the signs of ideas.
View quote | Quotes about Language

I am always sorry when any language is lost, because languages are the pedigrees of nations.
View quote | Quotes about Language

Language is the dress of thought.
View quote | Quotes about Language

What provokes your risibility, Sir? Have I said anything that you understand? Then I ask pardon of the rest of the company.
View quote | Quotes about Laughter

Lawyers know life practically. A bookish man should always have them to converse with.
View quote | Quotes about Law and Lawyers

I would be loath to speak ill of any person who I do not know deserves it, but I am afraid he is an attorney.
View quote | Quotes about Law and Lawyers

Turn on the prudent ant thy heedful eyes. Observe her labors, sluggard, and be wise.
View quote | Quotes about Laziness

Their learning is like bread in a besieged town: every man gets a little, but no man gets a full meal.
View quote | Quotes about Learning

Money and time are the heaviest burdens of life, and the unhappiest of all mortals are those who have more of either than they know how to use.
View quote | Quotes about Leisure

In a man's letters you know, Madam, his soul lies naked, his letters are only the mirror of his breast, whatever passes within him is shown undisguised in its natural process. Nothing is inverted, nothing distorted, you see systems in their elements, you discover actions in their motives.
View quote | Quotes about Letters

A short letter to a distant friend is, in my opinion, an insult like that of a slight bow or cursory salutation -- a proof of unwillingness to do much, even where there is a necessity of doing something.
View quote | Quotes about Letters

No place affords a more striking conviction of the vanity of human hopes than a public library.
View quote | Quotes about Libraries

He that embarks on the voyage of life will always wish to advance rather by the impulse of the wind than the strokes of the oar; and many fold in their passage; while they lie waiting for the gale.
View quote | Quotes about Life and Living

Love is the wisdom of the fool and the folly of the wise.
View quote | Quotes about Love

By taking a second wife he pays the highest compliment to the first, by showing that she made him so happy as a married man, that he wishes to be so a second time.
View quote | Quotes about Marriage

It is not from reason and prudence that people marry, but from inclination.
View quote | Quotes about Marriage

Marriage is the best state for man in general, and every man is a worst man in proportion to the level he is unfit for marriage.
View quote | Quotes about Marriage

There is, indeed, nothing that so much seduces reason from vigilance, as the thought of passing life with an amiable woman.
View quote | Quotes about Marriage

Marriage has many pains, but celibacy has no pleasures.
View quote | Quotes about Marriage

I would advise you Sir, to study algebra, if you are not already an adept in it: your head would be less muddy, and you will leave off tormenting your neighbors about paper and packthread, while we all live together in a world that is bursting with sin and sorrow.
View quote | Quotes about Mathematics

Melancholy, indeed, should be diverted by every means but drinking.
View quote | Quotes about Melancholy

The true art of memory is the art of attention.
View quote | Quotes about Memory

What is read twice is usually remembered more than what is once written.
View quote | Quotes about Memory

Men know that women are an over-match for them, and therefore they choose the weakest or most ignorant. If they did not think so, they never could be afraid of women knowing as much as themselves.
View quote | Quotes about Men and Women

The most heterogeneous ideas are yoked by violence together; nature and art are ransacked for illustrations, comparisons, and allusions; their learning instructs, and their subtlety surprises; but the reader commonly thinks his improvement dearly bought and, though he sometimes admires, is seldom pleased.
View quote | Quotes about Metaphysics

There are few minds to which tyranny is not delightful.
View quote | Quotes about Mind

Do not discourage your children from hoarding, if they have a taste to it; whoever lays up his penny rather than part with it for a cake, at least is not the slave of gross appetite; and shows besides a preference always to be esteemed, of the future to the present moment.
View quote | Quotes about Misers and Misery

Count on it, if a person talks of their misfortune, there is something in it that is not disagreeable to them.
View quote | Quotes about Misfortunes

That fellow seems to me to possess but one idea, and that is a wrong one.
View quote | Quotes about Mistakes

Whatever you have spend less.
View quote | Quotes about Money

There are few ways in which a man can be more innocently employed than in getting money.
View quote | Quotes about Money

Cruel with guilt, and daring with despair, the midnight murderer bursts the faithless bar; invades the sacred hour of silent rest and leaves, unseen, a dagger in your breast.
View quote | Quotes about Murder

Difficult do you call it, Sir? I wish it were impossible.
View quote | Quotes about Music

It is the only sensual pleasure without vice.
View quote | Quotes about Music

The Irish are a fair people: They never speak well of one another.
View quote | Quotes about Nationalities and Nationalism

The noblest prospect which a Scotchman ever sees is the high road that leads him to England.
View quote | Quotes about Nationalities and Nationalism

Much may be made of a Scotchman, if he be caught young.
View quote | Quotes about Nationalities and Nationalism

He that thinks he can afford to be negligent is not far from being poor.
View quote | Quotes about Neglect

Whoever thinks of going to bed before twelve o clock is a scoundrel.
View quote | Quotes about Night

The majority have no other reason for their opinions than that they are the fashion.
View quote | Quotes about Opinions

Your manuscript is both good and original; but the parts that are good are not original, and the parts that are original are not good.
View quote | Quotes about Originality

I found you essay to be good and original. However, the part that was original was not good and the part that was good was not original.
View quote | Quotes about Originality

Pleasure that is obtained by unreasonable and unsuitable cost, must always end in pain.
View quote | Quotes about Pain

He who makes a beast of himself gets rid of the pain of being a man.
View quote | Quotes about Pain

Pain is less subject than pleasure to careless expression.
View quote | Quotes about Pain

In all evils which admits a remedy, impatience should be avoided, because it wastes the time and attention in complaints which, if properly applied, might remove the cause.
View quote | Quotes about Patience

Patriotism is the last refuge of a scoundrel.
View quote | Quotes about Patriotism

Is not a patron, my lord, one who looks with unconcern on a man struggling for life in the water, and, when he has reached ground, encumbers him with help? The notice which you have been pleased to take of my labors, had it been early, had been kind; but it has been delayed till I am indifferent, and cannot enjoy it; till I am solitary, and cannot impart it; till I am known, and do not want it.
View quote | Quotes about Patronage

Patron: One who countenances, supports or protects. Commonly a wretch who supports with insolence, and is paid with flattery.
View quote | Quotes about Patronage

Great works are performed not by strength, but by perseverance.
View quote | Quotes about Perseverance

Distance has the same effect on the mind as on the eye.
View quote | Quotes about Perspective

If I have said something to hurt a man once, I shall not get the better of this by saying many things to please him.
View quote | Quotes about Persuasion

If he really thinks there is no distinction between vice and virtue, when he leaves our houses let us count our spoons.
View quote | Quotes about Philosophers and Philosophy

A wicked fellow is the most pious when he takes to it. He'll beat you all at piety.
View quote | Quotes about Piety

Piety practiced in solitude, like the flower that blooms in the desert, may give its fragrance to the winds of heaven, and delight those unbodied spirits that survey the works of God and the actions of men; but it bestows no assistance upon earthly beings, and however free from taints of impurity, yet wants the sacred splendor of beneficence.
View quote | Quotes about Piety

If a madman were to come into this room with a stick in his hand, no doubt we should pity the state of his mind; but our primary consideration would be to take care of ourselves. We should knock him down first, and pity him afterwards.
View quote | Quotes about Pity

Many things difficult in design prove easy in performance.
View quote | Quotes about Planning

Life must be filled up, and the man who is not capable of intellectual pleasures must content himself with such as his senses can afford.
View quote | Quotes about Plays

Pleasure is very seldom found where it is sought. Our brightest blazes are commonly kindled by unexpected sparks.
View quote | Quotes about Pleasure

If pleasure was not followed by pain, who would forbear it?
View quote | Quotes about Pleasure

No man is a hypocrite in his pleasures.
View quote | Quotes about Pleasure

Politics are now nothing more than means of rising in the world. With this sole view do men engage in politics, and their whole conduct proceeds upon it.
View quote | Quotes about Politicians and Politics

I had rather see the portrait of a dog that I know, than all the allegorical paintings they can show me in the world.
View quote | Quotes about Portraits

This mournful truth is everywhere confessed, slow rises worth by poverty depressed.
View quote | Quotes about Poverty and The Poor

Poverty is often concealed in splendor, and often in extravagance. It is the task of many people to conceal their neediness from others. Consequently they support themselves by temporary means, and everyday is lost in contriving for tomorrow.
View quote | Quotes about Poverty and The Poor

Resolve not to be poor: whatever you have, spend less. Poverty is a great enemy to human happiness; it certainly destroys liberty, and it makes some virtues impracticable, and others extremely difficult.
View quote | Quotes about Poverty and The Poor

It is the great privilege of poverty to be happy and yet unenvied, to be healthy with physic, secure without a guard, and to obtain from the bounty of nature what the great and wealthy are compelled to procure by the help of art.
View quote | Quotes about Poverty and The Poor

Nature makes us poor only when we want necessaries, but custom gives the name of poverty to the want of superfluities.
View quote | Quotes about Poverty and The Poor

He who praises everybody, praises nobody.
View quote | Quotes about Praise

The real satisfaction which praise can afford, is when what is repeated aloud agrees with the whispers of conscience, by showing us that we have not endeavored to deserve well in vain.
View quote | Quotes about Praise

A continual feast of commendation is only to be obtained by merit or by wealth: many are therefore obliged to content themselves with single morsels, and recompense the infrequency of their enjoyment by excess and riot, whenever fortune sets the banquet before them.
View quote | Quotes about Praise

A man who is good enough to go to heaven is not good enough to be a clergyman.
View quote | Quotes about Preachers and Preaching

Go into the street, and give one man a lecture on morality, and another a shilling, and see which will respect you most.
View quote | Quotes about Preachers and Preaching

Prejudice not being funded on reason cannot be removed by argument.
View quote | Quotes about Prejudice

Pride is seldom delicate; it will please itself with very mean advantages.
View quote | Quotes about Pride

He may justly be numbered among the benefactors of mankind, who contracts the great rules of life into short sentences, that may early be impressed on the memory, and taught by frequent recollection to occur habitually to the mind.
View quote | Quotes about Proverbs

Prudence operates on life in the same manner as rule of composition; it produces vigilance rather than elevation; rather prevents loss than procures advantage; and often miscarriages, but seldom reaches either power or honor.
View quote | Quotes about Prudence

Prudence is an attitude that keeps life safe, but does not often make it happy.
View quote | Quotes about Prudence

Ah! Sir, a boy's being flogged is not so severe as a man's having the hiss of the world against him.
View quote | Quotes about Public Opinion

Questioning is not the mode of conversation among gentlemen.
View quote | Quotes about Questions

Classical quotation is the parole of literary men all over the world.
View quote | Quotes about Quotations

He is a benefactor of mankind who contracts the great rules of life into short sentences, that may be easily impressed on the memory, and so recur habitually to the mind.
View quote | Quotes about Quotations

Every quotation contributes something to the stability or enlargement of the language.
View quote | Quotes about Quotations

Surely life, if it be not long, is tedious, since we are forced to call in the assistance of so many trifles to rid us of our time, of that time which never can return.
View quote | Quotes about Recreation

If I had no duties, and no reference to futurity, I would spend my life in driving briskly in a post-chaise with a pretty woman.
View quote | Quotes about Recreation

Why, Sir, most schemes of political improvement are very laughable things.
View quote | Quotes about Reform

The blaze of reputation cannot be blown out, but it often dies in the socket; a very few names may be considered as perpetual lamps that shine unconsumed.
View quote | Quotes about Reputation

Attention and respect give pleasure, however late, or however useless. But they are not useless, when they are late, it is reasonable to rejoice, as the day declines, to find that it has been spent with the approbation of mankind.
View quote | Quotes about Respectability

Treating your adversary with respect is giving him an advantage to which he is not entitled.
View quote | Quotes about Respectability

A mere literary man is a dull man; a man who is solely a man of business is a selfish man; but when literature and commerce are united, they make a respectable man.
View quote | Quotes about Respectability

Don't think of retiring from the world until the world will be sorry that you retire. I hate a fellow whom pride or cowardice or laziness drive into a corner, and who does nothing when he is there but sit and growl. Let him come out as I do, and bark.
View quote | Quotes about Retirement

Revenge is the act of passion, vengeance is an act of justice.
View quote | Quotes about Revenge

What ever the motive for the insult, it is always best to overlook it; for folly doesn't deserve resentment, and malice is punished by neglect.
View quote | Quotes about Revenge

And then, Sir, there is this consideration, that if the abuse be enormous, nature will rise up, and claiming her original rights, overturn a corrupt political system.
View quote | Quotes about Revolutions and Revolutionaries

Some people wave their dogmatic thinking until their own reason is entangled.
View quote | Quotes about Rhetoric

It is better to live rich, than to die rich.
View quote | Quotes about Riches

One cause, which is not always observed, of the insufficiency of riches, is that they very seldom make their owner rich.
View quote | Quotes about Riches

It is wonderful to think how men of very large estates not only spend their yearly income, but are often actually in want of money. It is clear, they have not value for what they spend.
View quote | Quotes about Riches

There mark what ills the scholar's life assail, toil, envy, want, and patron.
View quote | Quotes about Scholars and Scholarship

I am not able to instruct you. I can only tell that I have chosen wrong. I have passed my time in study without experience; in the attainment of sciences which can, for the most part, be but remotely useful to mankind. I have purchased knowledge at the expense of all the common comforts of life: I have missed the endearing elegance of female friendship, and the happy commerce of domestic tenderness.
View quote | Quotes about Scholars and Scholarship

When men come to like a sea-life, they are not fit to live on land.
View quote | Quotes about Sea

Where secrecy or mystery begins, vice or roguery is not far off.
View quote | Quotes about Secrets

To keep your secret is wisdom; but to expect others to keep it is folly.
View quote | Quotes about Secrets

The vanity of being known to be trusted with a secret is generally one of the chief motives to disclose it.
View quote | Quotes about Secrets

Security will produce danger.
View quote | Quotes about Security

That kind of life is most happy which affords us most opportunities of gaining our own esteem.
View quote | Quotes about self-esteem

Self-love is often rather arrogant than blind; it does not hide our faults from ourselves, but persuades us that they escape the notice of others.
View quote | Quotes about Self-love

The highest panegyric, therefore, that private virtue can receive, is the praise of servants.
View quote | Quotes about Servants

Life will not bear refinement. You must do as other people do.
View quote | Quotes about Simplicity

Nay, Madam, when you are declaiming, declaim; and when you are calculating, calculate.
View quote | Quotes about Sincerity

Truth, Sir, is a cow which will yield such people no more milk, and so they are gone to milk the bull.
View quote | Quotes about Skepticism

If a man could say nothing against a character but what he can prove, history could not be written.
View quote | Quotes about Slander

Solitude is dangerous to reason, without being favorable to virtue. Remember that the solitary mortal is certainly luxurious, probably superstitious, and possibly mad.
View quote | Quotes about Solitude

If you are idle, be not solitary; if you are solitary, be not idle.
View quote | Quotes about Solitude

Sorrow is a kind of rust of the soul, which every new idea contributes in its passage to scour away. It is the putrefaction of stagnant life, and is remedied by exercise and motion.
View quote | Quotes about Sorrow

Sorrow is the rust of the soul and activity will cleanse and brighten it.
View quote | Quotes about Sorrow

There is no wisdom in useless and hopeless sorrow, but there is something in it so like virtue, that he who is wholly without it cannot be loved.
View quote | Quotes about Sorrow

When speculation has done its worst, two and two still make four.
View quote | Quotes about Speculation

Round numbers are always false.
View quote | Quotes about Statistics

It was his peculiar happiness that he scarcely ever found a stranger whom he did not leave a friend; but it must likewise be added, that he had not often a friend long without obliging him to become a stranger.
View quote | Quotes about Strangers

The mind is refrigerated by interruption; the thoughts are diverted from the principle subject; the reader is weary, he suspects not why; and at last throws away the book, which he has too diligently studied.
View quote | Quotes about Students

He that is already corrupt is naturally suspicious, and he that becomes suspicious will quickly become corrupt.
View quote | Quotes about Suspicion

Suspicion is most often useless pain.
View quote | Quotes about Suspicion

Its proper use is to amuse the idle, and relax the studious, and dilute the full meals of those who cannot use exercise, and will not use abstinence.
View quote | Quotes about Tea

We love to overlook the boundaries which we do not wish to pass.
View quote | Quotes about Temptation

The drama's laws, the drama's patrons give, for we that live to please, must please to live.
View quote | Quotes about Theater

There is nothing, Sir, too little for so little a creature as man. It is by studying little things that we attain the great art of having as little misery and as much happiness as possible.
View quote | Quotes about Things and Little Things

When any calamity has been suffered, the first thing to be remembered is how much has been escaped.
View quote | Quotes about Tragedies

He that travels in theory has no inconveniences; he has shade and sunshine at his disposal, and wherever he alights finds tables of plenty and looks of gaiety. These ideas are indulged till the day of departure arrives, the chaise is called, and the progress of happiness begins. A few miles teach him the fallacies of imagination. The road is dusty, the air is sultry, the horses are sluggish. He longs for the time of dinner that he may eat and rest. The inn is crowded, his orders are neglected, and nothing remains but that he devour in haste what the cook has spoiled, and drive on in quest of better entertainment. He finds at night a more commodious house, but the best is always worse than he expected.
View quote | Quotes about Travel and Tourism

In traveling, a man must carry knowledge with him, if he would bring home knowledge.
View quote | Quotes about Travel and Tourism

The use of traveling is to regulate imagination by reality, and instead of thinking how things may be, to see them as they are.
View quote | Quotes about Travel and Tourism

Worth seeing? Yes; but not worth going to see.
View quote | Quotes about Travel and Tourism

As the Spanish proverb says, He who would bring home the wealth of the Indies, must carry the wealth of the Indies with him. So it is in travelling; a man must carry knowledge with him, if he would bring home knowledge.
View quote | Quotes about Travel and Tourism

Except during the nine months before he draws his first breath, no man manages his affairs as well as a tree. We are inclined to believe those whom we do not know because they have never deceived us.
View quote | Quotes about Trust

No government power can be abused long. Mankind will not bear it. There is a remedy in human nature against tyranny, that will keep us safe under every form of government.
View quote | Quotes about Tyranny

Sir, I have found you an argument; but I am not obliged to find you an understanding.
View quote | Quotes about Understanding

To be idle and to be poor have always been reproaches, and therefore every man endeavors with his utmost care to hide his poverty from others, and his idleness from himself.
View quote | Quotes about Unemployment

The world will never be long without some good reason to hate the unhappy; their real faults are immediately detected, and if those are not sufficient to sink them into infamy, an additional weight of calumny will be super added.
View quote | Quotes about Unhappiness

Praise, like gold and diamonds, owes its value only to its scarcity.
View quote | Quotes about Value

The longer we live the more we think and the higher the value we put on friendship and tenderness towards parents and friends.
View quote | Quotes about Value

There is nothing so much seduces reason from vigilance as the thought of passing life with an amiable woman in marriage.
View quote | Quotes about Vigilance

The wise man applauds he who he thinks most virtuous; the rest of the world applauds the wealthy.
View quote | Quotes about Virtue

Virtue is too often merely local.
View quote | Quotes about Virtue

Wickedness is always easier than virtue, for it takes a short cut to everything.
View quote | Quotes about Virtue

A vow is a snare for sin.
View quote | Quotes about Vow

A decent provision for the poor is the true test of civilization.
View quote | Quotes about Welfare

He that outlives a wife whom he has long loved, sees himself disjoined from the only mind that has the same hopes, and fears, and interest; from the only companion with whom he has shared much good and evil; and with whom he could set his mind at liberty, to retrace the past or anticipate the future. The continuity of being is lacerated; the settled course of sentiment and action is stopped; and life stands suspended and motionless.
View quote | Quotes about Widowhood

Wine gives a man nothing. It neither gives him knowledge nor wit; it only animates a man, and enables him to bring out what a dread of the company has repressed. It only puts in motion what had been locked up in frost.
View quote | Quotes about Wine

Wine makes a man better pleased with himself. I do not say that it makes him more pleasing to others... This is one of the disadvantages of wine, it makes a man mistake words for thoughts.
View quote | Quotes about Wine

He is no wise man who will quit a certainty for an uncertainty.
View quote | Quotes about Wisdom

He who has provoked the shaft of wit, cannot complain that he smarts from it.
View quote | Quotes about Wit

A man is in general better pleased when he has a good dinner upon his table, than when his wife talks Greek.
View quote | Quotes about Wives

Nature has given women so much power that the law has very wisely given them little.
View quote | Quotes about Women

All wonder is the effect of novelty on ignorance.
View quote | Quotes about Wonder

It is wonderful when a calculation is made, how little the mind is actually employed in the discharge of any profession.
View quote | Quotes about Work

That observation which is called knowledge of the world will be found much more frequently to make men cunning than good.
View quote | Quotes about World

Composition is, for the most part, an effort of slow diligence and steady perseverance, to which the mind is dragged by necessity or resolution, and from which the attention is every moment starting to more delightful amusements.
View quote | Quotes about Writers and Writing

I know not, Madam, that you have a right, upon moral principles, to make your readers suffer so much.
View quote | Quotes about Writers and Writing

In all pointed sentences, some degree of accuracy must be sacrificed to conciseness.
View quote | Quotes about Writers and Writing

The greatest part of a writer's time is spent in reading, in order to write; a man will turn over half a library to make one book.
View quote | Quotes about Writers and Writing

It is better to suffer wrong than to do it, and happier to be sometimes cheated than not to trust.
View quote | Quotes about Wrong

So different are the colors of life, as we look forward to the future, or backward to the past; and so different the opinions and sentiments which this contrariety of appearance naturally produces, that the conversation of the old and young ends generally with contempt or pity on either side.
View quote | Quotes about Youth

Youth enters the world with very happy prejudices in her own favor. She imagines herself not only certain of accomplishing every adventure, but of obtaining those rewards which the accomplishment may deserve. She is not easily persuaded to believe that the force of merit can be resisted by obstinacy and avarice, or its luster darkened by envy and malignity.
View quote | Quotes about Youth

Johnson, Samuel

No biography at present.

341 quotations